RECALL: Jennie-O Ground Turkey due to possible Salmonella

Jennie-O Turkey Store has issued a recall for various Jennie-O Ground Turkey products due to possible Salmonella contamination.

These products are no longer in stores, but they may be in your freezer. North Carolina is included in this recall.

Recalled products:

1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O GROUND TURKEY 93% LEAN | 7% FAT” with “Use by” dates of 10/01/2018 and 10/02/2018. UPC Code: 4222230200

1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O TACO SEASONED GROUND TURKEY” with a “Use by” date of 10/02/2018. UPC Code: 4222230202

1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O GROUND TURKEY 85% LEAN | 15% FAT” with a “Use by” date of 10/02/2018. UPC Code: 4222231307

1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O ITALIAN SEASONED GROUND TURKEY” with a “Use by” date of 10/02/2018. UPC CODE: 4222230203

See below for the statement released by Jennie-O on their website:

“On behalf of the thousands of Jennie-O team members, we were concerned to learn that someone became ill after exposure to Salmonella in a raw turkey product. The turkey industry has been working together for many years to reduce Salmonella. Despite these efforts, this particular Salmonella strain can be found in 29 different manufacturing plants from 19 different companies, according to government agencies. We know the issue of Salmonella isn’t specific to Jennie-O, and to that end, we plan on continuing our leadership role in the effort to reduce Salmonella and educate consumers on how to safely handle and prepare raw turkey and are calling on others in the industry to do the same. We will continue to collaborate on industry best practices with our peers in the turkey industry. As always, turkey remains safe to consume when handled and prepared properly. Jennie-O has information available on its website with step-by-step instructions on how to safely prepare and enjoy turkey.”
Steve Lykken
President, Jennie-O Turkey Store

About the recall: From our family to yours, we want you to know that we take consumer and food safety very seriously. Here’s everything you need to know to see if your Jennie-O® ground turkey product is part of the recall. This recall only affects a very limited number of Jennie-O® ground turkey tray pack products produced at one facility on one production day. Only this very small amount of product was affected.

IMPORTANT: No other Jennie-O® varieties, other packaging configurations, or code dates of are included in this recall. It is also important to note that this product should no longer be available in stores. All other Jennie-O® ground raw products are not affected by this recall.

Information on the recall:

If consumers have any questions about this recall or about cooking raw turkey, they can contact our consumer engagement team at https://www.jennieo.com/contactus or at 1.800.621.3505, Monday-Friday 8 am – 4 pm CT and Saturday and Sunday 9 am – 5 pm CT.

This single code date of ground turkey should no longer be available in stores.

No additional Jennie-O® products other than this single code date are involved in the recall and are safe to consume.

States where the affected product was shipped: AZ, CA, CO, FL, GA, IA, IL, IN, MI, MN, NC, NM, NV, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, SC, TX, UT, WA, WI

Here’s everything you need to know to see if your Jennie-O® ground turkey is part of the recall.

Products affected:

The raw ground turkey products items were produced on September 11, 2018. The following products are subject to recall:

1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O GROUND TURKEY 93% LEAN | 7% FAT” with “Use by” dates of 10/01/2018 and 10/02/2018. UPC Code: 4222230200

1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O TACO SEASONED GROUND TURKEY” with a “Use by” date of 10/02/2018. UPC Code: 4222230202

1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O GROUND TURKEY 85% LEAN | 15% FAT” with a “Use by” date of 10/02/2018. UPC Code: 4222231307

1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O ITALIAN SEASONED GROUND TURKEY” with a “Use by” date of 10/02/2018. UPC CODE: 4222230203

Step 1: Verify that your product is one of the listed varieties.

Step 2: Check the lower left corner of the front of the package and verify the establishment number is P190. If the establishment is not P190 the product is not part of the recall and is safe to consume.

Step 3: Turn the product on its side. The production code information is on the side of the sleeve.

Use or freeze by dates of 10/01/2018 are only included for the 93% lean 7% fat Ground Turkey 16oz.

Use or freeze by dates of 10/02/2018 are included for all the varieties listed.

Only these Use or Freeze By dates are included in the recall.

Step 4: You can either return it to the store where purchased for an exchange or call Consumer Engagement at 1-800-621-3505, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Central Time.

Additional information relevant to this recall can be found at https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/home.

Additional Information on safely preparing raw turkey:

Jennie-O Turkey Store has published four simple steps to stay safe. There are more great tips for our consumers at https://www.jennieo.com/content/four-easy-stepsmake sure their turkey meals are prepared safely and taste delicious.

As a reminder, the CDC is advising that consumers can continue to eat properly cooked turkey products, and that retailers continue selling raw turkey products.

Lastly, the National Turkey Federation is a great resource for more on this topic and has information at http://www.eatturkey.com/.

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Black Friday No Longer Just An American Event As It Spreads Internationally

Open Source Imagehttps://www.pexels.com/photo/chalkboard-with-brown-wooden-frame-surrounded-by-red-gift-boxes-1303099/

Black Friday is here among us. Well, almost anyway. We are already seeing the ads and deals appear on pamphlets, newspapers and all over the place online. However, the event is not just an American tradition anymore as it is spreading internationally with the retail chains leading the charge.

Growing up in the States, California in particular, I was very familiar with the Black Friday event or trend, depending on the way you look at this crazy shopping day, that followed Thanksgiving and will take place November 23 of this year. IT was a time where students and workers would generally have the day off and a time to go mad for shopping – or more likely, mad for a good deal when shopping.

The malls would be packed and open literally from midnight Thanksgiving at times all the way throughout the day. People would be standing outside for hours waiting for certain hot items before stores would even open. Some of these items, particularly electronics, had great deals going for them in many of the Black Fridays of the past years, particularly TV sets, PCs and gaming consoles.

I always encouraged friends and family who were in need of a new TV or computer around the end of the year and — who could spare to borrow a roomate’s or loved one’s set or console in the meantime — to wait until Black Friday or at least its ads before making a purchase. Some of the deals are really extraordinary, but they would go out fast, if limited in quantity, with so many shoppers looking to snatch a deal first.

What surprised me however about this day is that it is now becoming a thing internationally as well. I am now living in Warsaw, Poland and see Black Friday ads spreading to the retail chains here. I am sure this has been happening in many european countries for some years now as brick-and-mortar retail chains and corporations want to bank in on some of their international customers just as much as their domestic U.S.-based customers.

Black-Friday.pl logoBlack-Fridat.pl

For instance, there is a website in Poland focusing on Black Friday deals; and it even includes mention of Cyber Monday deals as well, which I will get to below as it is a more recent phenomenon and less widespread. When inputting the term Black Friday or Czarny Piątek (Polish translation) into Poland’s main search portal, Onet.pl, which is powered at least in-part by Google Search, you will find many sites showing deals and the specialty site I found has a good description of the event.

The description of Black Friday is on the bottom of the site explains and it is in Polish. It describes a bit how Black Friday is slowly but surely making its way here to more and more retailers. It doesn’t mention specific dates however, but here is my quick translation of the text:

“In Poland this day, despite not being as popular as in North American countries (U.S. And Canada) , is becoming more popular every year. Among Polish consumers, it is being called “Black Friday Polska” [Poland], or simply “Czarny Piątek.”

You can then input the retail outlets below to go to their main website, although many have Black Friday listings already up and showing some of the links simply direct to the main page of the site without additional info. The info above makes it clear, however, in Poland this day is becoming popular as well as Cyber Monday among many retailers, some are still coming around or are more quiet about it in the days or weeks ahead of time unlike in the U.S.

To show just how trendy the term “Black Friday” is becoming internationally, all it takes is googling it across international VPNs (or physical locations if you travel or have friends and family elsewhere) and languages. You will see how the trend has spread from region to region in different times. South African Black Friday, for instance, really took off only two years ago.

According to Business Insider SA , “Black Friday started in the US as a shopping day where retailers offer massive discounts. The phenomenon has gained momentum in South Africa since 2016, with stampedes as shoppers fight each other for marked-down products.”

Another thing that became a thing as more retail chains around the world, at least in first-world countries, are becoming digitized and eCommerce is taking over, is an event known as Cyber Monday. Now this event is more tied to the major U.S. retailers, particularly Amazon, and less of a thing here in Poland yet, as Amazon is not even officially here yet (we have to ship items from Germany or nearby countries). However, slowly this trend is also making its way here as well as internationally.

Black Friday actually has quite an interesting of a history that you can read about on History.com. It actually existed in name only or not as officially as it does today since the 1950s in the U.S. It started out in Philadelphia out of the chaos of the shopping spree that took place in a vacuum the day after Christmas in the city and was a term coined by police in a negative context.

“Back in the 1950s, police in the city of Philadelphia used the term to describe the chaos that ensued on the day after Thanksgiving, when hordes of suburban shoppers and tourists flooded into the city in advance of the big Army-Navy football game held on that Saturday every year. Not only would Philly cops not be able to take the day off, but they would have to work extra-long shifts dealing with the additional crowds and traffic. Shoplifters would also take advantage of the bedlam in stores to make off with merchandise, adding to the law enforcement headache.”

So you see, some events start out without a plan or as I previously said, in a vacuum, and spread from one place to another over time. Some events may also start out with a bad connotation or a phrase coined that originally meant something else than it became over time. Such was the case with Black Friday. Lets hope those deals keep coming though and it becomes something more than just a marketing gimmick over time.

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Open Source Imagehttps://www.pexels.com/photo/chalkboard-with-brown-wooden-frame-surrounded-by-red-gift-boxes-1303099/

Black Friday is here among us. Well, almost anyway. We are already seeing the ads and deals appear on pamphlets, newspapers and all over the place online. However, the event is not just an American tradition anymore as it is spreading internationally with the retail chains leading the charge.

Growing up in the States, California in particular, I was very familiar with the Black Friday event or trend, depending on the way you look at this crazy shopping day, that followed Thanksgiving and will take place November 23 of this year. IT was a time where students and workers would generally have the day off and a time to go mad for shopping – or more likely, mad for a good deal when shopping.

The malls would be packed and open literally from midnight Thanksgiving at times all the way throughout the day. People would be standing outside for hours waiting for certain hot items before stores would even open. Some of these items, particularly electronics, had great deals going for them in many of the Black Fridays of the past years, particularly TV sets, PCs and gaming consoles.

I always encouraged friends and family who were in need of a new TV or computer around the end of the year and — who could spare to borrow a roomate’s or loved one’s set or console in the meantime — to wait until Black Friday or at least its ads before making a purchase. Some of the deals are really extraordinary, but they would go out fast, if limited in quantity, with so many shoppers looking to snatch a deal first.

What surprised me however about this day is that it is now becoming a thing internationally as well. I am now living in Warsaw, Poland and see Black Friday ads spreading to the retail chains here. I am sure this has been happening in many european countries for some years now as brick-and-mortar retail chains and corporations want to bank in on some of their international customers just as much as their domestic U.S.-based customers.

Black-Friday.pl logoBlack-Fridat.pl

For instance, there is a website in Poland focusing on Black Friday deals; and it even includes mention of Cyber Monday deals as well, which I will get to below as it is a more recent phenomenon and less widespread. When inputting the term Black Friday or Czarny Piątek (Polish translation) into Poland’s main search portal, Onet.pl, which is powered at least in-part by Google Search, you will find many sites showing deals and the specialty site I found has a good description of the event.

The description of Black Friday is on the bottom of the site explains and it is in Polish. It describes a bit how Black Friday is slowly but surely making its way here to more and more retailers. It doesn’t mention specific dates however, but here is my quick translation of the text:

“In Poland this day, despite not being as popular as in North American countries (U.S. And Canada) , is becoming more popular every year. Among Polish consumers, it is being called “Black Friday Polska” [Poland], or simply “Czarny Piątek.”

You can then input the retail outlets below to go to their main website, although many have Black Friday listings already up and showing some of the links simply direct to the main page of the site without additional info. The info above makes it clear, however, in Poland this day is becoming popular as well as Cyber Monday among many retailers, some are still coming around or are more quiet about it in the days or weeks ahead of time unlike in the U.S.

To show just how trendy the term “Black Friday” is becoming internationally, all it takes is googling it across international VPNs (or physical locations if you travel or have friends and family elsewhere) and languages. You will see how the trend has spread from region to region in different times. South African Black Friday, for instance, really took off only two years ago.

According to Business Insider SA , “Black Friday started in the US as a shopping day where retailers offer massive discounts. The phenomenon has gained momentum in South Africa since 2016, with stampedes as shoppers fight each other for marked-down products.”

Another thing that became a thing as more retail chains around the world, at least in first-world countries, are becoming digitized and eCommerce is taking over, is an event known as Cyber Monday. Now this event is more tied to the major U.S. retailers, particularly Amazon, and less of a thing here in Poland yet, as Amazon is not even officially here yet (we have to ship items from Germany or nearby countries). However, slowly this trend is also making its way here as well as internationally.

Black Friday actually has quite an interesting of a history that you can read about on History.com. It actually existed in name only or not as officially as it does today since the 1950s in the U.S. It started out in Philadelphia out of the chaos of the shopping spree that took place in a vacuum the day after Christmas in the city and was a term coined by police in a negative context.

“Back in the 1950s, police in the city of Philadelphia used the term to describe the chaos that ensued on the day after Thanksgiving, when hordes of suburban shoppers and tourists flooded into the city in advance of the big Army-Navy football game held on that Saturday every year. Not only would Philly cops not be able to take the day off, but they would have to work extra-long shifts dealing with the additional crowds and traffic. Shoplifters would also take advantage of the bedlam in stores to make off with merchandise, adding to the law enforcement headache.”

So you see, some events start out without a plan or as I previously said, in a vacuum, and spread from one place to another over time. Some events may also start out with a bad connotation or a phrase coined that originally meant something else than it became over time. Such was the case with Black Friday. Lets hope those deals keep coming though and it becomes something more than just a marketing gimmick over time.

Read More